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Re: [1listSculpting] 6mm - 10mm and shrinking masters

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  • Jake Staines
    ... According to the stuff they had out at Games Day/Golden demon back when I was still attending such events (probably about six or seven years now, but I
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 1, 2004
      On 01/07/2004, 04:08, verirus wrote:

      > Another question if anyone knows the answer, is about shrinking
      > masters. I've hear that GW somehow shrinks larger masters of
      > their plastic epic 6mm line.  Does anyone know anything about
      > that process?  Is it true that they do it?

      According to the stuff they had out at Games Day/Golden demon back
      when I was still attending such events (probably about six or seven
      years now, but I doubt it's changed drastically) this was something
      they do with all their plastics; a 6-up original is made then a rough
      mould made from that, then they have this crazy setup to duplicate the
      mould on a 1/6th scale; it's basically a set of mechanically-joined
      arms (like that picture-copying toy from the eighties) with a probe on
      one side that the mouldmaker runs over the indentation in the master
      mould and a scribe on the other that carves a new smaller mould into a
      (IIRC) metal surface. Successively smaller and more accurate probes
      are run around the original mould to build up the shape of the figure
      but the mechanical linkings convert all the motion into the smaller
      scale...

      (...but then, you know, I was young, naïve, they could have just been
      lying to us... ;-)

      --
      Jake
    • jacques gerber
      ... Funny enough thats exactly how molds are usually cut. The arm is called a protrator. Preiser, who have a range of figurines that s astonishing, use this
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 1, 2004
        Hello Jake:

        > (...but then, you know, I was young, naïve, they could have just been
        > lying to us... ;-)

        Funny enough thats exactly how molds are usually cut. The arm is called
        a protrator. Preiser, who have a range of figurines that's astonishing,
        use this technique.

        Jacques (who's nickname is Jake)
      • capng123
        ... on ... into a ... It s called a pantograph if anyone cares....
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 1, 2004
          >it's basically a set of mechanically-joined
          > arms (like that picture-copying toy from the eighties) with a probe
          on
          > one side that the mouldmaker runs over the indentation in the master
          > mould and a scribe on the other that carves a new smaller mould
          into a
          > (IIRC) metal surface.

          It's called a "pantograph" if anyone cares....
        • Bob Lippman
          ... I always use magnification when working that small and I tend to use dental picks and needles for tools. Suggest details rather than actually
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 2, 2004
            At 03:08 AM 7/1/2004 +0000, you wrote:
            >I've been going through the archives to get as much info as I can
            >about scuplting 6mm and 10mm but couldn't find that much.
            >Bob Lippman has pictures of some of his great 10mm work in
            >the files but no one has ever posted a how-to or instructional
            >pics.
            <snip>

            I always use magnification when working that small and I tend to use dental
            picks and needles for tools. Suggest details rather than actually
            sculpting them. A little putty goes a long way. Use 28 gauge steel floral
            wire for your armatures. I sculpt body parts and such in one go. I don't
            try to do stuff the same way I do 28m figures, where it makes sense to do
            an arm, a hand and a weapon in 3 separate stages. This never works in
            10mm, as you get too much distortion and scale creep, and even if you don't
            the surface area of the mini is too small to get tiny additions of putty to
            stick on properly.


            >Another question if anyone knows the answer, is about shrinking
            >masters. I've hear that GW somehow shrinks larger masters of
            >their plastic epic 6mm line. Does anyone know anything about
            >that process? Is it true that they do it?

            There is a machine called a 3D pantograph that does that. I know that
            Matchbox uses it to make cars, but car bodies have no undercuts in them, so
            I don't think a typical industrial pantograph can do a figure, and Lord
            knows what one costs anyway, probably in the hundreds of thousands...
            --
            Bob Lippman <ALTBOB@...>

            Freelance miniature sculpture:
            <http://f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/figmentia_miniatures>



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          • jppatton1@aol.com
            In a message dated 7/2/2004 10:42:07 AM Eastern Standard Time, ... I use one to draw up my trousers. I think it s been a full two years since I used that line
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 3, 2004
              In a message dated 7/2/2004 10:42:07 AM Eastern Standard Time,
              1listSculpting@yahoogroups.com writes:

              > >it's basically a set of mechanically-joined
              > >arms (like that picture-copying toy from the eighties) with a probe
              > on
              > >one side that the mouldmaker runs over the indentation in the master
              > >mould and a scribe on the other that carves a new smaller mould
              > into a
              > >(IIRC) metal surface.
              >
              > It's called a "pantograph" if anyone cares....

              I use one to draw up my trousers.


              I think it's been a full two years since I used that line on this list. . .
              not that it couldn't have gone longer.

              Joel, lurking uselessly and hard

              the Mini-A-Week project at Minutiae
              http://www.minutiae-minis.com


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