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RE: AW: [18xx] 1825 was: Re: 1829 Mainline

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  • Lou Jerkich
    We normally play four-player games of 1825, although I have records of a three-player and a six-player game as well. One thing that has become apparent is
    Message 1 of 50 , Mar 1, 2006
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      We normally play four-player games of 1825, although I have records of a three-player and a six-player game as well. One thing that has become apparent is that each player is likely to have floated a company before anyone gets a second one. Thus, one of the Directors of the first four companies to start is inevitably going to win. With that in mind....

      Record of games we've played showing the # of shares in Directorships held by the winner:

      Unit 1 (4-player)
      1. LSWR(4), LT&S(4), M&GN(6)
      2. GWR(4), LT&S(4), M&GN(6)

      Unit 1+2 (4-player unless noted)
      1. MR(4), LSWR(5), LT&S(10)
      2. GER(8), NER(5), M&GN(10) {GER was the 4th company to float}
      3. LSWR(5), LBSC(5) [6-player] {LSWR was 6th company floated}

      Unit 2 (4-player unless noted)
      1. LNWR(4), L&Y(5), NSR (4) [3-player]
      2. L&Y (6)
      3. MR(4), GNR(7) {GNR was best stock, at 340}
      4. MR(8), NSR(8)
      5. L&Y(6), NSR(6)

      Unit 2+3 4-player)
      1. MR (3), CR (5 ), GCR (7), HR(4)
      2. MR(8), GNR(7), Furness(8)

      Observations:
      Unit 1 and Unit 1+2:
      The LNWR player has yet to win! Otherwise, the GWR, GER, and LSWR players have each won, with the LSWR player winning twice, and notably being a part of the winner's holding when the MR player won a game. Note that the GER was the 4th company to float in the game in which its Director won. Note even more that the LSWR was the 6th company to float in the 6-player game in which its Director won.

      In games involving Unit 2 or Unit 2+3, the MR seems dominant. However, in the 3rd Unit 2 game, the final value of the MR was only 255, whereas the leading stock in that game was the GNR which reached 340--a clear case of a later company (the 6th to be floated), being the best stock of the game. In the second Unit 2 game, a bare bones one without Minors, the L&Y stock was not the most valuable, and it edged out the second-place GCR player by only a mere 200. Only in the Unit 2+3 games does the MR seem to have a decided edge. However, in the first of those games, MR shares were well-distributed among the four players. The other player owning three shares of MR came in 3rd. I'd credit the CR and GNR (floated 6th and 7th) as being the decisive edge for the winner in that game. In the last Unit 2+3 game, it was foolish for the three other players to let one player own so much MR stock. Nevertheless, it was some poor choices in final stock purchases that cost the 2nd place player the game and left the MR player to sail ahead. The 2nd place player had the NBR, GCR, NSR and GSWR, which started quite late. The latter was the poor investment.

      If you are finding the winners to normally own a Directorship of one of the first two companies floated, I suggest that either the players are allowing one player to own too many shares in one of those initial stocks, you are not using your token placements to hinder the rapid development of those companies, or you haven't been making the most of the companies that you do own.

      --Lou Jerkich

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Michael Br´┐Żnker
      To: 18xx@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: 2/28/2006 3:27:10 PM
      Subject: AW: [18xx] 1825 was: Re: 1829 Mainline


      Hi Lou,

      thank you for your answer. But I and I think also my group thinks worse
      about 1825 than your group. For us it is not as enjoyable as many other
      games. We made the experience that players who become director of a later
      company have no chance of winning. I am glad for you that is not so in your
      group, but we didn't make your good experiences and so we 1825 is played
      very seldom.

      Michael

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • petermabey2002
      ... When we played the original 1829 (in 1975), we used the compass rose to position the white counter to mark the phase: N phase 1, E phase 2, S 3 & W 4,
      Message 50 of 50 , Jan 29, 2010
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        --- In 18xx@yahoogroups.com, "SMITH, Jon" <jon.m.smith@...> wrote:
        >
        > ...
        > * The white counter is the turn marker - like 1825U2 - it is there - but
        > there is no space on the board for it.
        >
        When we played the original 1829 (in 1975), we used the compass rose to position the white counter to mark the phase: N phase 1, E phase 2, S 3 & W 4, though that doesn't seem to have made it to the rules.
        >
        > It played pretty well solitaire ...

        I can't find the solitaire option in any of the ones I have (1829 N & S, 1825 part 1, 1853, 1830 & 1835) so I assume it's peculiar to Mainline, which I'm missing. Could I have rules to see if it could be adapted to another version?
        >
        ... (snipped) ...
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