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RE: [18cLife] Used clothing in the colonies

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  • Barbara Bockrath
    Hi Jim Strong, ... Lucky me - I just rec d _Chronicles of the Cumberland Settlements, 1779-1796_ by Paul Clements for my b day. If I find out anything on the
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 3, 2013
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      Hi Jim Strong,

      > I know that there were used clothing vendors in London, so I have a question
      > about the same in the colonies................>
      >
      Lucky me - I just rec'd _Chronicles of the Cumberland Settlements, 1779-1796_
      by Paul Clements for my b'day. If I find out anything on the subject of
      traveling peddlers and second hand clothing, , I'll let you know . However,
      it is 785 pages long, so............ have patience <smile>

      In the meantime, you might ask your library for Harriette S. Arnow's works:
      _Seedtime on the Cumberland_ and _Flowering of the Cumberland_.
      She also wrote _The Dollmaker_ and some other things.

      You could also ask your ref librarian if your county ever sponsored one of those
      _History of >>>>> County_ reference volumes which were so popular around 1900.

      I rather think the answer to your question will be, "no". I bet you will find references to
      home spun, to linsey- woolsey, and to male citizens wearing loin cloths and leggings to
      "save" their breeches ........ and their dignity in general! That sort of leads us back to
      the ever dour Rev. Charles Woodmason and the Rev. Joseph Doddridge. YOU
      cam read Doddridge; I cannot tolerate the man and will never read it again.

      Just an idea - do you have any friends at the Schiele Museum in Gastonia, NC?
      I'd check with them - they are a great source of information on the Carolinas.

      Best of luck ~ Auntie B in the [Pitts]burgh


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • dydman
      Thank you. I know that there were a moderate # of tailors with moderate/poor skills in their background; just wondering if the traveling peddlers carried
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 4, 2013
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        Thank you.
        I know that there were a moderate # of "tailors" with moderate/poor skills in their background; just wondering if the traveling peddlers carried used garments with them, since cloth was the preponderance of the expense of garments.
         
        Salisbury, on the Great Wagon Road and a significant east-west indian trading path, was a town of some substance, and there were peddlers from there going into the area between the upper Catawba and Yadkin Rivers. This area (and on down to Charlottetown) was settled by Scots-Irish who came down the Wagon Road, starting in the early 40's to late 50's, and were somewhat people of more means than the Scots-Irish who came here mostly through Charlestown and moved up above Camden - the people with whom Woodmason had dealings. The only instance, I know of, of men wearing clouts and leggings was the NC Provencials from Fort Dobbs on the Forbes campaign, and no reference of their ever being any "long hunters" at the fort. Rowan and Mecklenburg counties were prosperous when compared to the area from Camden up to Waxhaw (sc/nc)
         
        I will check with the Schiele Museum and Michael Scoggins, a local historian of some repute for the area.Again, Thank you
         
        Jim Strong
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Tuesday, September 03, 2013 8:52 PM
        Subject: RE: [18cLife] Used clothing in the colonies

         


        Hi Jim Strong,

        > I know that there were used clothing vendors in London, so I have a question
        > about the same in the colonies................>
        >
        Lucky me - I just rec'd _Chronicles of the Cumberland Settlements, 1779-1796_
        by Paul Clements for my b'day. If I find out anything on the subject of
        traveling peddlers and second hand clothing, , I'll let you know . However,
        it is 785 pages long, so............ have patience <smile>

        In the meantime, you might ask your library for Harriette S. Arnow's works:
        _Seedtime on the Cumberland_ and _Flowering of the Cumberland_.
        She also wrote _The Dollmaker_ and some other things.

        You could also ask your ref librarian if your county ever sponsored one of those
        _History of >>>>> County_ reference volumes which were so popular around 1900.

        I rather think the answer to your question will be, "no". I bet you will find references to
        home spun, to linsey- woolsey, and to male citizens wearing loin cloths and leggings to
        "save" their breeches ........ and their dignity in general! That sort of leads us back to
        the ever dour Rev. Charles Woodmason and the Rev. Joseph Doddridge. YOU
        cam read Doddridge; I cannot tolerate the man and will never read it again.

        Just an idea - do you have any friends at the Schiele Museum in Gastonia, NC?
        I'd check with them - they are a great source of information on the Carolinas.

        Best of luck ~ Auntie B in the [Pitts]burgh


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

      • Barbara Bockrath
        Thank you, Jim Strong, for the reference to the Forbes Campaign. We here in da burgh do get a bit home town possessive about it! You didn t give a rage of
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 4, 2013
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          Thank you, Jim Strong, for the reference to the Forbes Campaign.  We here in da 'burgh do get
          a bit "home town possessive" about it!

          You didn't give a rage of dates for your question.  Being an F&I person, I
          naturally thought in my proffered era prior to the AWI.   We know that there was
          an economic depression right after the war, which *might* affect the results of your inquiry.

          Still pondering on your question, I pulled out _Buying into the World of Goods: Early Consumers
           in Backcountry Virginia_ Ann Smart Martin.

          Professor Martin, U of Wisc. Madison,  based her work on the surviving records
          of John Hook, country merchant, upper Shenandoah Valley c 1760-1810.
          Sorry, no second hand clothing mentioned.

          There does exist _Studies in Early American Economy and Society from the Library
          Company of Philadelphia_, Cathy Matson, Series Editor.  I have no knowledge about
          it or Ms. Matson, but perhaps one of our List contributors does.

          Bon chance ~ B.


          I know that there were a moderate # of "tailors" with moderate/poor skills in their background; just wondering if the traveling peddlers carried used garments with them, since cloth was the preponderance of the expense of garments.
           
          S__
        • dydman
          Thank you for your info. The time period was more related to the 70 s. I was at ligonier for the 250th - absolutely beautiful countryside, and the 12 pounder
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 4, 2013
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            Thank you for your info. The time period was more related to the 70's. I was at ligonier for the 250th - absolutely beautiful countryside, and the 12 pounder echoing down the valley was awesome! I guess us poor crackers will have to make due with old, patched, worn-out clothes - have to remove the red paint from my heels <grin>. During the 50's I am supposed to be supplied with clothing by Gov. Dobbs/King Geo. II, but both fail me!
             
            Jim
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Wednesday, September 04, 2013 9:45 AM
            Subject: RE: [18cLife] Used clothing in the colonies

             





            Thank you, Jim Strong, for the reference to the Forbes Campaign.  We here in da 'burgh do get
            a bit "home town possessive" about it!

            You didn't give a rage of dates for your question.  Being an F&I person, I
            naturally thought in my proffered era prior to the AWI.   We know that there was
            an economic depression right after the war, which *might* affect the results of your inquiry.

            Still pondering on your question, I pulled out _Buying into the World of Goods: Early Consumers
             in Backcountry Virginia_ Ann Smart Martin.

            Professor Martin, U of Wisc. Madison,  based her work on the surviving records
            of John Hook, country merchant, upper Shenandoah Valley c 1760-1810.
            Sorry, no second hand clothing mentioned.

            There does exist _Studies in Early American Economy and Society from the Library
            Company of Philadelphia_, Cathy Matson, Series Editor.  I have no knowledge about
            it or Ms. Matson, but perhaps one of our List contributors does.

            Bon chance ~ B.


            I know that there were a moderate # of "tailors" with moderate/poor skills in their background; just wondering if the traveling peddlers carried used garments with them, since cloth was the preponderance of the expense of garments.
             
            S__

          • carolkocian
            I just got a brochure for this in the mail, less than a month away! Gadsby s symposia have always been wonderful. The Road to Regency Fashion includes 1770
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 4, 2013
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              I just got a brochure for this in the mail, less than a month away!
              Gadsby's symposia have always been wonderful. "The Road to Regency
              Fashion" includes 1770 to 1820.

              http://www.alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/historic/info/gadsbys/OnlineBrochure.pdf

              or

              http://www.alexandriava.gov/GadsbysTavern
            • dkmsc144
              Thank you Wendy for this link, it was indeed really interesting! I am wondering about the same up east, here in New England :) Best, Kathy --- In
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 5, 2013
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                Thank you Wendy for this link, it was indeed really interesting! I am wondering about the same up east, here in New England :) Best, Kathy 



                --- In 18cLife@yahoogroups.com, <18clife@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                Philadelphia had used clothing and slop shops (ready made) - Really good
                read:

                Http://udspace.udel.edu/handle/19716/10156

                
                Wendy Moyer

                Historically Sew

                307 N Third St Perkasie PA 18944
                267-371-9476

                Find us on Facebook at Historically Sew

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