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Re: linen tape sources [Was: [18cLife] Re: Lacing on a man's waistcoat]

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  • Wendy Moyer
    Check book binding suppliers...they often have the dutch and German tapes  Wendy Moyer Historically Sew 307 N Third St Perkasie PA 18944 267-371-9476 Find
    Message 1 of 15 , Jul 2, 2013
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      Check book binding suppliers...they often have the dutch and German tapes

      
      Wendy Moyer

      Historically Sew

      307 N Third St Perkasie PA 18944
      267-371-9476

      Find us on Facebook at Historically Sew

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jen Dobyns
      Hi Patti, I will second what Don Hagist said regarding lacing waistcoats. It wasn t really done. If it is properly fitted to the wearer, there is no need. As
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 3, 2013
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        Hi Patti,

        I will second what Don Hagist said regarding lacing waistcoats. It wasn't really done.

        If it is properly fitted to the wearer, there is no need. As this is a custom garment for your BIL, then it should fit him pretty snugly without the lacing and that's that. If at some point he grows a bit around the middle, well, you may just want to hold onto the scraps so you can piece on a bit more fabric if necessary--piecing is completely acceptable on period garments. Depending on what kind of seam allowance you have, you could open it up and get a bit more room before you have to piece it, though.

        Come to think of it, at no time in the workshop on waistcoats with Neal Hurst was lacing the back of a waistcoat an option. Neal Hurst is a journeman tailor in CW until about a week from now.

        Jen

        --- In 18cLife@yahoogroups.com, "ellyceirma" <misspatti@...> wrote:
        >
        > I just finished making a lovely wool 18th c. waistcoat for my BIL. It is deep navy blue with gold metal buttons. I used an off-white cotton twill tape for the lacing but I wonder if there should be something a little dressier than that. The waistcoat is the same fabric front and back. Possibly there will be a coat in the future but, for now, the waistcoat is all there is and the lacing will show.
        >
        > My questions to the dear readers of this assemblage are these: What kinds of lacing were used in waistcoats where the back does show? How does social class figure into this?
        >
        > Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge.
        >
        > Patti
        > A humble seamstress in the lower part of the Georgia colony.
        >
      • Barbara Bockrath
        ... Is there any way pronouns can be eliminated from the English language? I, Auntie B in the Burgh., a just now catching on that the original question from
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 3, 2013
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          >
          > Hi Patti,
          >
          > I will second what Don Hagist said regarding lacing waistcoats. It wasn't really done.
          >
          > If it is properly fitted to the wearer, there is no need.

          Is there any way pronouns can be eliminated from the English language?

          I, Auntie B in the 'Burgh., a just now catching on that the original question from
          Patti concerned the fit of a brand NEW waistcoat a *very* local customer, Bill.
          D'accord. The garment should fit him.

          My take was that of ....... did average people ever split and lace up the back seam
          of an outgrown garment in order to get more wear from it.

          "My people", to invoke another hated pronoun, live west of the Allegheny Mountains.
          They have a demographic tendency to be farmers (they use the word "planters" on
          local documents) who own between 200 and 250 acres (there was a legal reason for
          that number) of mostly uncleared land; were what we call today Scots-Irish Presbyterians,
          with a good sprinkling of germanic types and a few people who are just difficult to
          pigeonhole, such as Devereaux Smith and Hugh Henry Breckridge.

          Yes, there were a lot of hunting shirts and leggins worn, but the men of dignity of the
          new West Augusta Court District seemed to have owned breeches, waistcoat and coat
          for Court sessions, Sabbath, and Militia days. One "formal" outfit which was worn for years.

          No successful farmer - today or then - would spend hard earned money - and there was
          exceedingly little hard cash money out here at the time - on fancy duds when they needed
          to buy a good bull, or try another variety of wheat seed in order to try and break the wheat
          blight Once again, Solon Buck, _Planting of Civilization in Western Pennsyvlania - and
          other local records. Mend it, make do, do without. "They ain't none anyways, none atall".
          _The Latimers_, Hugh McCook.

          Is there any way we, the List, can invent quick "slang" pronouns so that our far-flung
          readership can comprehend instantly Who, what, where and when is being discussed.
          No one all "People in the 18th Century" fits all.

          Dans la soupe encore, la Vieille Tante, B from Ft. Duquesne




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Miss Hallie
          Dear List, Henry Cooke has in his collection an original waistcoat, with lacing and the original lacing cord (it is not tape). As a gentleman grew in age and
          Message 4 of 15 , Jul 4, 2013
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            Dear List,

            Henry Cooke has in his collection an original waistcoat, with lacing and the original lacing cord (it is not tape). As a gentleman grew in age and prosperity (aka pot belly) a waistcoat can be enlarged with additional pieces sewn into the sides or the ultimate adjustment of splitting the back and using lacing. A new made to measure waistcoat would not require lacing for fit. It should fit right out of the gate.

            Hallie

            --- In 18cLife@yahoogroups.com, "Jen Dobyns" <jendobyns@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Patti,
            >
            > I will second what Don Hagist said regarding lacing waistcoats. It wasn't really done.
            >
            > If it is properly fitted to the wearer, there is no need. As this is a custom garment for your BIL, then it should fit him pretty snugly without the lacing and that's that. If at some point he grows a bit around the middle, well, you may just want to hold onto the scraps so you can piece on a bit more fabric if necessary--piecing is completely acceptable on period garments. Depending on what kind of seam allowance you have, you could open it up and get a bit more room before you have to piece it, though.
            >
            > Come to think of it, at no time in the workshop on waistcoats with Neal Hurst was lacing the back of a waistcoat an option. Neal Hurst is a journeman tailor in CW until about a week from now.
            >
            > Jen
            >
            > --- In 18cLife@yahoogroups.com, "ellyceirma" <misspatti@> wrote:
            > >
            > > I just finished making a lovely wool 18th c. waistcoat for my BIL. It is deep navy blue with gold metal buttons. I used an off-white cotton twill tape for the lacing but I wonder if there should be something a little dressier than that. The waistcoat is the same fabric front and back. Possibly there will be a coat in the future but, for now, the waistcoat is all there is and the lacing will show.
            > >
            > > My questions to the dear readers of this assemblage are these: What kinds of lacing were used in waistcoats where the back does show? How does social class figure into this?
            > >
            > > Thank you so much for sharing your knowledge.
            > >
            > > Patti
            > > A humble seamstress in the lower part of the Georgia colony.
            > >
            >
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