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Re: [18cLife] colors and age [Was: printed, unbalanced linen stripe]

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  • Amy McCarty
    Thank you! I was hoping for a happy 18th century colour. My husband and I are talking about linen right now regarding even modern use. I LOVE linen and was
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 30, 2013
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      Thank you! I was hoping for a happy 18th century colour. My husband and I are talking about linen right now regarding even modern use. I LOVE linen and was saying that if it wasn't okay for reenactments I would make a pretty modern dress

      Use context clues on this message because it was sent from my iPhone

      On Jun 30, 2013, at 9:36 AM, Sue Felshin <sfelshin@...> wrote:

      > On Jun 29, 2013, at 10:29 PM, Amy McCarty wrote:
      > > Now I would assume this fabric would be best for a young woman and not an older woman. Or could a 40 year old wear such happy colours?
      >
      > That's an interesting question, and I don't have a good answer. (But I'm replying anyway to update the subject line and trim down quoted material to the bare minimum. :-)
      >
      > We modern people generally look younger than our 18c age mates due to better nutrition and health care, less hard labor, and less time spent in the sun. So you could portray an age 10 years younger than your actual age if you wanted. On the other hand, that might not fit with other parts of your portrayal -- 18c people (in some areas, anyway) typically started having children in their 20s, so if you're 40 years old with a 15-year-old child, it would be implausible to claim you're 30, because then you'd have had a child when you were 15.
      >
      > A lot of older women in 18c art wear dark, sober colors, but a lot of them are widows. I haven't made a study of age and color. Has anyone else?
      >
      > Also, those sheets of yours aren't wild and crazy as far as color goes -- they're just white, blue, a moderate shade of yellow, and brown. I may be wrong, but it seems to me they'd be fine for a woman of any age who isn't wearing mourning colors.
      >
      > Your affectionate servant,
      > Sue Felshin
      > sfelshin@...
      >
      >


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    • Barbara Bockrath
      Dear Amy, ... Why not look at the issue from a different angle? You have read the costume books and the wonderful art sites on the Internet. Have you
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 1, 2013
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        Dear Amy,
        > >
        > > A lot of older women in 18c art wear dark, sober colors, but a lot of them are widows. I haven't made a study of age and color. Has anyone else?
        >

        Why not look at the issue from a different angle? You have read the costume
        books and the wonderful art sites on the Internet. Have you enjoyed any good
        books about the actual conditions of the area and time of "who you want to be"?

        I'm going to pick on Boston - because yountzes is tired of hearin' 'bout Pittsburgh an' yat.
        Have you read Nathaniel Philbrick's _Battle of Bunker Hill_? Brand new and excellent.
        (OK, he did grow up in Pittsburgh ) If that sounds like January reading instead of July
        reading, you can always go to the library and get out Thomas Fleming's _Liberty Tavern_.
        You are not looking for clothing descriptions; you are looking for how events of the day
        shaped people's lives. Tracts from your local historical society can be very helpful also.

        If Abigail Adams is reduced to using dressing pins for cash, what is a woman of limited
        means, husband away, food in short supply, dressing pins lost or bent and snapped off
        going to do to fasten her well-worn garments? Think about it. Your call; not mine.

        The second consideration is ...... yourself? What do you like? You know, you are not
        "required" to be your real self when in kit. Look at all those guys in their uniforms and
        muskets. Are they all REALLY 20 years old and physically fit???

        I enjoy my friend Elizabeth, who in real life is Lord and Taylor all the way, but when she
        is in her Native interpretation, does she ever love all her Dave Hughes trade silver "bling"!
        If you really "take" to the Hobby, you may find that you have more than one persona,
        depending upon the event. You may end up doing more than one period. I love my own
        F&I club because it has some five divisions and any member can switch interpretations
        at will just by telling the POC that the member wishes to try out something else. It's fun.

        Personally, I do think you are a "heroine" for asking about the parameters of historical
        accuracy regarding the pattern of the fabric. Why should you worry about looking old and dreary
        if your heart is still lively and fun loving? As Cannonball Adderly sang, "Fun. F U N. Fun. It's some-
        thing you do when ............"

        Dans la soupe encore -
        Auntie B, who is la Vieille Tante B dans la Nouvelle France, poor dictee and all.









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