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Re:QUERY: help with my kinesthetic first grader

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  • Spetzi
    I just need to know if there is a curriculum out there compatible to this style of learning. You will definitely get the hang of being a teacher to a
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 10, 2007
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      "I just need to know if there is a curriculum out there compatible to this style of learning. "

      You will definitely get the hang of being a teacher to a kinesthetic learner, but you might have to put aside your original vision of teacher/student.

      I had several moments of thinking "No, you can't do that physical moving/touching/singing, we're trying to learn here." When actually, those kinesthetic processes were helping my dd to learn. So I had to learn to say, "Why not?" when she came up with something or even suggest things myself when she wasn't paying attention.

      I would use manipulatives for math. I love the math rods from Math U See. Let him get out of his chair. Do skip counting/adding/subtracting while doing jumping jacks. My kids love things like Fandex (found at rainbow resource) or even just cards of pictures/facts/works of art. National Geographic makes some great cards (size of playing cards) sold at WalMart with the presidents, animals, etc.

      I would also recommend lapbooking. It's a huge subject and I am not an expert, but the general idea is to compile info that the child has learned into a fancy file folder.

      My best advice is to keep researching kinsthetic learners and to open your mind and your child will do well.


      Jenifer in NJ
      dd 10, ds 8, dd 5, dd 2



      ---------------------------------
      Be a better Heartthrob. Get better relationship answers from someone who knows.
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    • Alicia Bayer
      You might find helpful stuff in Montessori methods, which have a lot of elements that work well for kinesthetic learners like making sandpaper letters and
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 11, 2007
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        You might find helpful stuff in Montessori methods, which have a lot
        of elements that work well for kinesthetic learners like making
        sandpaper letters and assembling puzzles of the life cycles.

        It may also help to just adapt a regular curriculum to his learning
        style and likes. For instance, have him copy words by writing with
        his finger in lotion spread on a cookie sheet, practice math drills
        while bouncing a ball back and forth, do a lot of hands on learning
        like science projects (sprouting seeds, dissecting a green pepper when
        you cook and seeing what happens when you sprinkle different things on
        ice cubes are all easy examples of hands on science) and so on.

        You may want to check out resources like _Homeschool Your Child For
        Free_ from the library and consider putting together your own
        curriculum while you figure out what works best for him. You can get
        a skills list of what he would typically learn in 1st grade from the
        world book enclyclopedia site (google it for the page and it's a link
        on the front page), and then just work on those subjects together as
        the year goes by. That's what I do with my kids and it works well for
        us because we can tailor everything to their individual needs and work
        on their schedule.

        Also keep in mind that reading and writing are subjects that click at
        different ages for different kids. If part of the bumpy road was
        struggling with reading, don't worry too much. Kids learn to read at
        very different ages and it just doesn't click until they're ready,
        just as they don't learn to talk or walk until they're ready no matter
        what we do with them. We tend to teach reading much earlier nowadays
        than we used to, but kids don't necessarily read any younger despite
        our best efforts. Your son may be a great reader but I thought I'd
        mention it since that seems to be such a big concern with kids of that
        age.

        I really think the most important part of schooling in the early years
        is establishing a love of learning and making school fun. If you can
        accomplish that then the rest comes much more easily! :)

        Hope that helps. Good luck!

        On 6/9/07, Fareeha Qazi <fareehamunawar@...> wrote:
        > I am new to homeschooling. I just finished kindergarten with my 6 year
        > old son (he's just turned six). It was quite a bumpy road for me. I guess I didn't quite acquaint myself with the inner dimensions of HS. I am reading about different types of learning styles now and I am leaning toward the fact that my son is kinesthetic learner. I just need to know if there is a curriculum out there compatible to this style of learning.
        --
        Alicia

        A Magical Childhood
        http://www.magicalchildhood.com

        "The best way to make children good is to make them happy."
        - Oscar Wilde
      • L. McIntyre
        I just need to know if there is a curriculum out there compatible to this style of learning. My son is also a kinesthetic learner. That basically
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 18, 2007
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          "I just need to know if there is a curriculum out there compatible to this
          style of learning. "

          My son is also a kinesthetic learner. That basically translates into: Must
          in engage large muscle groups in order to turn on the brain. My son often
          stands up to do his schoolwork. He also moves constantly: bouncing his
          knees, shaking or swinging his legs and feet or drumming while thinking. I
          found that doing PE early with him gets his brain ready to learn. You may
          also want to try getting a big exercise ball for him to sit on while he's
          doing his work as opposed to a regular chair. He will activating those
          large muscle groups just to keep upright.....he may even bounce a
          little....it's unconventional, but it works.

          My son is now 10 and an excellent student..........I found the curriculum
          mattered less than HIS METHOD of working.

          Hope that helps, too........lorrie
        • Momma
          I love the answers to this post. They are helping me also. I didn t even know the name of my sons learning style , LOL, I just knew he learns better while
          Message 4 of 9 , Sep 9, 2007
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            I love the answers to this post. They are helping me also. I didn't
            even know the name of my sons 'learning style', LOL, I just knew he
            learns better while bouncing and moving!!
            My son is also in first grade. I am not even using a 'curriculum'. I
            get most things like worksheets, flash cards, etc., free online. (I
            just print the flash cards on regular paper and 'lamenate' them using
            clear plastic shelf liner)
            I turned one wall in the hallway into a giant 'number line', by
            taping numbers on the base board, he adds and subtracts by hopping or
            jumping from number to number, LOL. I am going to have to think of
            something else soon though, he is getting too good at adding and
            subtracting numbers 1 to 10 and our hallway is too short to go up to
            20 unless I put them a lot closer together and that will take away
            from the jumping!!
            I may have to use a curriculum later on, but I don't think its
            necessary the first few years of elementary school. It would actually
            cause me a lot more work, not to mention the expense, at this point
            since my son is ahead in math but a little slower with reading and
            writing skills. I would have to research seperate curriculums, grade
            levels, etc. for each subject. :oP
            Now, if anyone has any ideas to help me teach him to read I would
            love to hear!! He knows quite a few site words and the sound each
            letter makes, but just hasn't been able to get to the next step. and
            his printing is horrible!! :o(
            Thanks for listening, Cheri
          • psychram
            Hi Cheri - I am just starting out with my son who is 2 1/2. I bought the First Reader program by Phillys Schlaffly. It actually reminds me of how I learned
            Message 5 of 9 , Sep 24, 2007
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              Hi Cheri - I am just starting out with my son who is 2 1/2. I
              bought the First Reader program by Phillys Schlaffly. It actually
              reminds me of how I learned to read when I was a kid - I can't
              believe I remember that. You'll find it easily if you Google it I'm
              sure. Hope this helps.
              Shari

              --- In 0-homeschoolreviews@yahoogroups.com, "Momma" <momma.home@...>
              wrote:
              >
              > I love the answers to this post. They are helping me also. I
              didn't
              > even know the name of my sons 'learning style', LOL, I just knew
              he
              > learns better while bouncing and moving!!
              > My son is also in first grade. I am not even using a 'curriculum'.
              I
              > get most things like worksheets, flash cards, etc., free online.
              (I
              > just print the flash cards on regular paper and 'lamenate' them
              using
              > clear plastic shelf liner)
              > I turned one wall in the hallway into a giant 'number line', by
              > taping numbers on the base board, he adds and subtracts by hopping
              or
              > jumping from number to number, LOL. I am going to have to think of
              > something else soon though, he is getting too good at adding and
              > subtracting numbers 1 to 10 and our hallway is too short to go up
              to
              > 20 unless I put them a lot closer together and that will take away
              > from the jumping!!
              > I may have to use a curriculum later on, but I don't think its
              > necessary the first few years of elementary school. It would
              actually
              > cause me a lot more work, not to mention the expense, at this
              point
              > since my son is ahead in math but a little slower with reading and
              > writing skills. I would have to research seperate curriculums,
              grade
              > levels, etc. for each subject. :oP
              > Now, if anyone has any ideas to help me teach him to read I would
              > love to hear!! He knows quite a few site words and the sound each
              > letter makes, but just hasn't been able to get to the next step.
              and
              > his printing is horrible!! :o(
              > Thanks for listening, Cheri
              >
            • ToleHappy
              Message 6 of 9 , Sep 25, 2007
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                <<<Now, if anyone has any ideas to help me teach him to read I would
                love to hear!! He knows quite a few site words and the sound each
                letter makes, but just hasn't been able to get to the next step. and
                his printing is horrible!! >>>

                I would recommend "Teaching Your Child To Read In One Hundred Easy Lessons".
                It's what I've used for all three of mine at home. And it was used with an
                older child who started in PS but never learned phonics, and therefore
                struggled with reading for years. It really helped him a lot.

                As for printing.don't sweat the small stuff. He may not have the motor
                skills for better handwriting just yet. I have also come to believe that
                neatness in handwriting has a lot to do with genetics! Practice can and
                does help.but it's not everything! :-( Also-I would recommend that you
                get him to tracing things to help develop the muscles needed for writing
                rather than focus so much on letter formation right now.

                Sometimes.nothing seems to help until THEY become motivated! One son of
                mine had horrible handwriting at age 12.and nothing I said or did seemed to
                help. But a girl commented on his poor handwriting once, and you should
                have seen the difference he started making in his writing! It still wasn't
                really GOOD, but it improved a lot.

                I have some children who can write very nicely.and some whose writing looks
                akin to chicken scratch! Much like my mother's.My own handwriting tends to
                favor one of my aunt's. So I've concluded a lot of the ability is
                attributed to genetics-though I would in no way just totally give up!



                Kathy Edwards

                Cleveland, TN

                ToleHappy@...





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • connietondo@comcast.net
                for a little help go to Wikipedia and type in kinesthetic there are websites listed for help with them ... From: psychram Hi Cheri - I
                Message 7 of 9 , Sep 26, 2007
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                  for a little help go to Wikipedia and type in kinesthetic there are websites listed for help with them

                  -------------- Original message --------------
                  From: "psychram" <psychram@...>
                  Hi Cheri - I am just starting out with my son who is 2 1/2. I
                  bought the First Reader program by Phillys Schlaffly. It actually
                  reminds me of how I learned to read when I was a kid - I can't
                  believe I remember that. You'll find it easily if you Google it I'm
                  sure. Hope this helps.
                  Shari

                  --- In 0-homeschoolreviews@yahoogroups.com, "Momma" <momma.home@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > I love the answers to this post. They are helping me also. I
                  didn't
                  > even know the name of my sons 'learning style', LOL, I just knew
                  he
                  > learns better while bouncing and moving!!
                  > My son is also in first grade. I am not even using a 'curriculum'.
                  I
                  > get most things like worksheets, flash cards, etc., free online.
                  (I
                  > just print the flash cards on regular paper and 'lamenate' them
                  using
                  > clear plastic shelf liner)
                  > I turned one wall in the hallway into a giant 'number line', by
                  > taping numbers on the base board, he adds and subtracts by hopping
                  or
                  > jumping from number to number, LOL. I am going to have to think of
                  > something else soon though, he is getting too good at adding and
                  > subtracting numbers 1 to 10 and our hallway is too short to go up
                  to
                  > 20 unless I put them a lot closer together and that will take away
                  > from the jumping!!
                  > I may have to use a curriculum later on, but I don't think its
                  > necessary the first few years of elementary school. It would
                  actually
                  > cause me a lot more work, not to mention the expense, at this
                  point
                  > since my son is ahead in math but a little slower with reading and
                  > writing skills. I would have to research seperate curriculums,
                  grade
                  > levels, etc. for each subject. :oP
                  > Now, if anyone has any ideas to help me teach him to read I would
                  > love to hear!! He knows quite a few site words and the sound each
                  > letter makes, but just hasn't been able to get to the next step.
                  and
                  > his printing is horrible!! :o(
                  > Thanks for listening, Cheri
                  >




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Momma
                  Thank you for the info! :o) The cheapest I can find this (searching with google) is $20, and another $20 for the workbook that goes with it. I will probably
                  Message 8 of 9 , Sep 27, 2007
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                    Thank you for the info! :o)
                    The cheapest I can find this (searching with google) is $20, and
                    another $20 for the workbook that goes with it.
                    I will probably have to stick with what I have for now. :o(

                    Cheri

                    --- In 0-homeschoolreviews@yahoogroups.com, "psychram" <psychram@...>
                    wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Cheri - I am just starting out with my son who is 2 1/2. I
                    > bought the First Reader program by Phillys Schlaffly. It actually
                    > reminds me of how I learned to read when I was a kid - I can't
                    > believe I remember that. You'll find it easily if you Google it
                    I'm
                    > sure. Hope this helps.
                    > Shari
                    >
                    > --- In 0-homeschoolreviews@yahoogroups.com, "Momma" <momma.home@>
                    > wrote:
                    > >
                    > > I love the answers to this post. They are helping me also. I
                    > didn't
                    > > even know the name of my sons 'learning style', LOL, I just knew
                    > he
                    > > learns better while bouncing and moving!!
                    > > My son is also in first grade. I am not even using
                    a 'curriculum'.
                    > I
                    > > get most things like worksheets, flash cards, etc., free online.
                    > (I
                    > > just print the flash cards on regular paper and 'lamenate' them
                    > using
                    > > clear plastic shelf liner)
                    > > I turned one wall in the hallway into a giant 'number line', by
                    > > taping numbers on the base board, he adds and subtracts by
                    hopping
                    > or
                    > > jumping from number to number, LOL. I am going to have to think
                    of
                    > > something else soon though, he is getting too good at adding and
                    > > subtracting numbers 1 to 10 and our hallway is too short to go up
                    > to
                    > > 20 unless I put them a lot closer together and that will take
                    away
                    > > from the jumping!!
                    > > I may have to use a curriculum later on, but I don't think its
                    > > necessary the first few years of elementary school. It would
                    > actually
                    > > cause me a lot more work, not to mention the expense, at this
                    > point
                    > > since my son is ahead in math but a little slower with reading
                    and
                    > > writing skills. I would have to research seperate curriculums,
                    > grade
                    > > levels, etc. for each subject. :oP
                    > > Now, if anyone has any ideas to help me teach him to read I would
                    > > love to hear!! He knows quite a few site words and the sound each
                    > > letter makes, but just hasn't been able to get to the next step.
                    > and
                    > > his printing is horrible!! :o(
                    > > Thanks for listening, Cheri
                    > >
                    >
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