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Re: SURVEY: How did you start?

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  • mrspsycho
    Hi! My name is Kath. We are in our second year of home schooling. When we started my husband was not really for the idea. I felt very strongly about not
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 24, 1998
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      Hi! My name is Kath. We are in our second year of home schooling. When we started my husband was not really for
      the idea. I felt very strongly about not wanting them to go to public school. I did not want some one teaching
      our children things that we don't believe in. (example .....that homosexuality is just another way of life...or
      someone else teaching our children about sex , influencing their beliefs on our children.etc..) I kept after my
      husband and asked him to let me try and if he was not satisfied with the results that we could then put our
      daughter in school. (Our oldest was about to start her kindergarten year.) He agreed and within a few weeks
      time he seen how much the girls were learning and has supported me all the way. We are also in a cooperative
      learning group and we love home schooling. There are so many benefits from home schooling... no peer pressure,
      the girls learning at their pace and not someone else's, instilling family morals and bonding. And the girls can
      learn and talk about God ...something that public schools don't teach or allow.
      Kath
    • LauraMaery (Gold) Post
      Dear folk of the Reviews list: Would you be kind enough to tell me how it is you came to be a homeschooler? I am particularly interested in your reasons for
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 22, 2000
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        Dear folk of the Reviews list:

        Would you be kind enough to tell me how it is you came to be
        a homeschooler? I am particularly interested in your reasons
        for taking your babeeze out of public school, but I'd also
        love to hear from those of you convicted enough to have NEVER
        ps'ed.

        Thank you!

        --lauramaery, she of the seven babeeze...
      • Susan D. Clawson
        ... My kiddies have never gone to ps. When my oldest, now 11, was just barely 2 and in the church s nursery, he couldn t sit still. He d finish with the
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 25, 2000
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          > Would you be kind enough to tell me how it is you came to be
          > a homeschooler? I am particularly interested in your reasons
          > for taking your babeeze out of public school, but I'd also
          > love to hear from those of you convicted enough to have NEVER
          > ps'ed.


          My kiddies have never gone to ps. When my oldest, now 11, was just barely 2
          and in the church's nursery, he couldn't sit still. He'd finish with the
          little cut and paste activity very quickly and then want to move on other
          things. Usually running around because all the other kids were sitting
          still and trying to find where to paste the circle and where to paste the
          triangle <G>.

          I got very tired of him being treated as if he were a behavior problem.

          I had only heard of homeschooling on a sit-com. the mom started hs'ing her
          son because he was getting mixed up with the wrong kids at school. I didn't
          think that this kind of thing really existed, until I learned that there was
          a homeschool family 5 doors down! I picked their brains and learned that
          there were homeschool families at my church. I picked their brains.

          At this time my dh was in Saudi Arabia with the air force. One day he
          called and I told him that I had decided that we'd homeschool. He said that
          we should think about it, and I told him,"No. You don't understand. I've
          already decided." I've never looked back.

          At that time I had no idea that homeschooling was such a huge movement. I
          figured that I'd just have to find books at Barnes & Noble and fake it.
          Funny that 9 years later, we do exactly this!

          To sum it up, we started because I couldn't bare the thought of my sweet
          active child being forced to sit in one seat all day long. How unnatural!
          We do it now because we love it.



          ---
          Susie Clawson
          ---------------
          read the current issue of
          I Love Homeschool
          http://www.xmission.com/~clawson
        • christianmom1328@aol.com
          In a message dated 2/24/00 8:07:50 PM Eastern Standard Time, hsmomof5@xmission.com writes: , filled with books and materials
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 25, 2000
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            In a message dated 2/24/00 8:07:50 PM Eastern Standard Time,
            hsmomof5@... writes:

            << My hs closet is
            total chaos <G>, filled with books and materials that looked great in the
            catalog but turned into busy work and not fun. >>

            Hi Susie,

            I had this also and found <http://www.vegsource.com> and sold them all.
            Of course, once I did that I bought a bunch of new ones!! :o)

            Christine from MA

            ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
            Justice - When you get what you deserve
            Mercy - When you don't get what you deserve
            Grace - When you get what you don't deserve
            ~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*
            For God so loved the world that He gave His only begotten Son, that whoever
            believes in Him should not perish but have everlasting life. John 3:16
          • friendrt@aol.com
            This is our first year of Homeschooling. My children are 4 and 6. I felt led by the lord to homeschool and am constantly confirmed that we are doing the best
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 25, 2000
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              This is our first year of Homeschooling. My children are 4 and 6. I felt
              led by the lord to homeschool and am constantly confirmed that we are doing
              the best for our children. Among many other reasons, we were concerned with
              the vulnerability of our children's characters and desired to keep them under
              our protective influence until they are able to stand firm against peer
              pressure. Our oldest has already enjoyed learning and we have always enjoyed
              teaching her, so once I found out what public schools were teaching, I
              realized that she would not be very challenged academically.

              The first thing I did was establish a daily routine and schedule. This
              included teaching the kids to be responsible for getting themselves ready
              (with some prompting), making their beds, and taking turns at feeding our
              dogs. To encourage them to do this I made up a "job chart" that each morning
              they got to put a sticker on for each job completed. After about two months,
              they forgot about the stickers and usually do their responsibilities without
              complaining.

              We aim to start "school" at 9am each morning but if we don't get started
              until later or are ready earlier, that works. I had to become more flexible
              so as to make myself easier to live with and make learning a fun experience.
              I started by writing a weekly lesson plan which works for us very well. It
              was especially helpful in the beginning to keep us all on track with the
              learning goals for the day. Though again, I have become more flexible with
              this and allow the interest of the kids take us away from the plan if it is
              educational.

              Robin
              Redding, Ca
            • GBatch1@aol.com
              lmg writes:
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 25, 2000
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                lmg writes:

                <<Would you be kind enough to tell me how it is you came to be a
                homeschooler? I am particularly interested in your reasons for taking your
                babeeze out of public school, but I'd also love to hear from those of you
                convicted enough to have NEVER ps'ed. >>

                My husband first introduced me to homeschooling. He told me he wanted our
                children homeschooled shortly after our first was born. He had children from
                a prior marriage and had some experience with homeschooling, and was adamant
                that our children be taught at home. I was opposed at first, but for sake of
                peace, I felt compelled to study into it more deeply. I read several books
                on the subject at the library, including one by Raymond & Dorothy Moore. My
                initial response to the books I read was surprise. I was completely
                surprised that there were parents out there who were homeschooling their
                children successfully, and their children were growing up well-educated and
                well-rounded. I was very impressed. So, I borrowed some notes from that
                year's homeschooling convention, and read them all. I started to become
                excited about the prospect of homeschooling. I attended the homeschooling
                convention the following year, and that sealed it for me. I knew
                homeschooling was something I had to do!

                For me, homeschooling started as an exciting opportunity to really explore
                life and bond with my children. In order to work through my initial
                insecurities about teaching my children by myself, and doing a good enough
                job at it, I bought the entire 1st grade Abeka curriculum, and started
                working through it with my little 3-year-old. The phonics didn't work for
                me, so I ended up experimenting with other phonics programs until I settled
                on Sing, Spell, Read, Write. I was very focussed at that time to keep my
                children one grade level above where they WOULD be had they gone to ps, so
                that I could be reassured that they were not falling behind their peers, etc.
                It helped give me confidence in the beginning. I don't do that anymore.

                My children are: Luke (9), Jamie (8), Sylvie (7), Penny (5), Tristan (3),
                and Holly (2). I have taught and plan to teach them all at home. I have a
                supportive and talented husband who speaks 3 foreign languages and plays the
                piano, so when the time comes, I plan to lean on him for help in instructing
                the children in a foreign language (or more!), and music. We both sing, and
                the children love to sing with us.

                I have relaxed over the years and have decided to natural flow of learning to
                push aside worksheets, etc. I still use a lot of Abeka materials for
                English, history, science, and health, but I use Saxon (Horizons for the 2nd
                and 3rd grades) for math, and we move as rapidly or as slowly as we need to
                from day to day. The use these materials as a base, a place to leap off
                from, and add whatever else we want when we want. We also have several
                Jumpstart CDs, Math-It, and Somebody games for variety.

                I realize I have veered off the subject, so I'll get right back on. I may
                not have started homeschooling because of deep-seated convictions or
                religious beliefs, or a desire to protect my kids, but I do have those things
                now. I believe that I am the best person to teach my children. The reason I
                know this is that teaching academics, although very important, is only ONE of
                a variety of necessary factors in preparing a child for adulthood. Why
                remove a child from a loving, nurturing home for the majority of the day, for
                the entirety of his or her childhood (the formative years in particular), to
                be taught and guided by strangers??? It makes NO sense to me. I am a
                stay-at-home-mom. I want my children to be stay-at-home-children. I have
                been homeschooling now for about 6 years (intensively for the last four
                years!). I've taught every one of them to read in turn (the last 2 are still
                coming up). I absolutely LOVE having them home with me! I LOVE learning
                with them when we study something that I may not have known or studied. I
                love them to see my own excitement when I learn something, and I LOVE to see
                THEIR excitement when they learn something. I want to experience the first
                time they really start reading, and see the thrill on their little faces when
                they realize they've cracked the code to language! Why would that be less
                important or less exciting than being there for my child's first step? first
                smile? first spoken word? On the contrary, it is equally important, and I
                don't feel I should be deprived of the experience, and more than my children
                should be deprived of sharing it with me!

                Mary B.
                Sandy, Utah
                GBatch1@...

                [MODERATOR: What a great story, Mary! Thanks for sharing! -- lauramaery]
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